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2001: at The Tech


Docking Station

Docking Station

at The Tech

2001: Destination Space runs through September 3, 2001.

2001: Destination Space compares the science and technology found in the film 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), and in the artwork of Robert McCall, to real science and technology of today.

Rare movie props, film clips, movie stills, spacecraft models, and original artwork enhance the comparison between science fiction and science fact. Interactive components throughout the exhibition demonstrate some of the science and technology depicted in the film and paintings. Visitors can "Ask HAL" questions, such as why computers like HAL do not yet exist, and listen to his answers. Visitors can try to dock the space shuttle to the International Space Station in an actual NASA computer simulation-and get an idea of how difficult it really is-then take a virtual tour of the space station.

In the Life Tech Theatre, visitors will also be able to participate in a lively 15-minute performance about exploration. Everyone is an explorer-come and find out how. Join the fun Thursdays through Sundays in April and May.


Stanley Kubrick and Robert McCall

Stanley Kubrick and Robert McCall

at thetech.org

2001: Destination Space runs through September 3, 2001.

As long as there has been technology, people have tried to imagine what it might be like in the future. Books, films, television shows, and artwork have depicted blimpy spaceships, cell-phone-sized weapons, and human-like robots, sometimes believably but usually with scant regard to reality. This online exhibition looks at the futuristic vision of technology in the film 2001: A Space Odyssey and in the paintings of artist Robert McCall.

Both Stanley Kubrick's movie and McCall's paintings have something besides technology in common—they share a strong basis in reality. Kubrick and Arthur C. Clarke spent years talking with scientists and researchers to make sure that the technology would not look dated soon after the film's release. Some of their ideas have stood the test of time. Indeed, some are commonplace. Others, like an orbiting hotel, are still in the future. Similarly, McCall spent many years studying and painting airplanes before turning his talent to NASA's space program. He applies the same meticulous attention to detail whether portraying the Hubble Space Telescope or creating impossible hovering cities.

2001: A Space Odyssey inspired a generation of computer scientists, engineers, and others to strive for such goals as computers that sense emotions or permanent space stations. In a similar way Robert McCall hopes his paintings inspire future generations of innovators to see what could be—and create it.







The Tech Museum of Innovation