Choose another animal:
Chameleon | Bat | Fly | Platypus | Grasshopper | Rhino

Giant Squid
  1. Beak and Radula
  2. Eyes
  3. Esophagus
  4. Fin
  5. Funnel
  6. Gill
  7. Stomach
  8. Sucker
  9. Tentacle

A Giant Squid is a twenty-yard-long, streamlined, underwater predator, the hunter-killer submarine of the animal world. This robot version shows how the propulsion machinery and deadly weapons of the squid make it such a fearsome creature. However, although it rarely loses its battles, it is unlikely to be able to escape from the sperm whale. The squid is the main food of the giant mammal.

Surprisingly, the giant squid is actually a scaled-up relative of the tiny black slugs that you may find in the backyard. The same body sections that make a harmless slug are rebuilt into a fast-swimming hunter a thousand times longer than the slug. This huge creature has immense eyes that are able to find food in the dimly lit deep seas. It has strong suckered tentacles for catching prey, and a powerful, sharp beak for biting and holding onto food.




More About Giant Squids:


Beak and Radula

top

A clamp and rotating rasp for tearing up food.


Eyes

top

Also known as the visual receptors. A squid's eyes are enormous, to catch as much light as possible in the dim depths of the ocean.


Esophagus

top

Tube for taking food to the digestion chambers.


Fin

top

Postional stabilizers that keep the squid steady in water and adust it's postion.


Funnel

top

Multidirectional nozzle used for jet propulsion, and expelling water, waste, ink and eggs.


Gill

top

Bellows for breathing and propulsion that are contained inside the mantle cavity.


Stomach

top

Internal food-processing chambers.


Sucker

top

Suction pads for extra grip.


Tentacle

top

Arms equiped with several suckers, and internally lined with coiled tubing for greater flexibility of the arms.


Giant Squid Facts:

Habitat: deep oceans, diving
Length: up to 60ft. (18 m)
Weight: 1,000lb (450 kg)
Closest relative: cuttlefish


 Choose another animal: Chameleon | Bat | Fly | Platypus | Grasshopper | Rhino








Special thanks to B.J. Heinley and Brian Buschmann.